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Using EXIF Data | Tutorial Photography

Using EXIF Data Tutorial Photography

Using EXIF Data Tutorial Photography

Using EXIF Data | Tutorial Photography

Using EXIF Data – tutorialphotography.com existence is indeed doing her best to present the articles are ‘far’ from the technical language that can be easily understood by those of you who are starting the world of photography. This time we will review a topic that does not seem all beginner photographers familiar with this. The subject is familiar with the EXIF ??data, it is not actually a complex subject, but it will be very useful.

Using EXIF Data Tutorial Photography

Using EXIF Data Tutorial Photography

EXIF stands for data ‘Exchangeable Image File’, and contains EXIF information of an image or a photo provided by the digital camera. EXIF will contain information when shooting images in JPEG format (or TIFF). Almost all manufacturers of digital cameras have EXIF support this feature, and even though you understand the ins and outs of the camera or not, they will still record this information along with the photos of you.

The best way to discuss this is possible only by showing the EXIF data in the image below.

EXIF data associated with the photo above, can be viewed in several ways:

1. The first way to see the EXIF data when the memory card is still in the digital camera, the Canon DSLR you can do by pressing the ‘info’ at Preview mode. You will be presented with information about the Shutter Speed, Aperture, date and time of the shooting and others
2. Another way to see the EXIF data is by right-clicking on a photo or image file and click the ‘Properties’, if you are using Windows XP then it will appear like this.
3. The final way to see the EXIF data is to use editing software. For this example tutorialphotography.com using Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 3.3, so the software is on the right sidebar select Metadata column, and then choose the EXIF, it will automatically display the information as shown below:

Now you can see some information about the photo, including the camera is being used, the resolution, the time and date of shooting, shutter speed, ISO, aperture and even the bottom there is information that is used Focal Lenght (50mm). Please remember that, possibly with a different camera or different software will display the detail information of different as well (usually an older camera will contain less information), but basically all will display the basic information.

EXIF data will be very useful in a number of purposes, but the main thing is allows photographers to compare the images and figure out what is right and wrong in the outcome of the photo. For example, when looking at the photo above again and think ‘Ohh, should I use a depth of field that is wider that faces evenly focused’. Thought so then I can see the aperture is used when shooting f / 2, so next time if I want the depth of field that is wider, I at least use a smaller aperture (f/2.8 or f/3.5).

Using EXIF data may not something you would do on any the images of you, but this will be very useful if you are in a new position began to enter the world of digital photography and want to improve your photography techniques.

Now you can see some information about the photo, including the camera is being used, the resolution, the time and date of shooting, shutter speed, ISO, aperture and even the bottom there is information that is used Focal Lenght (50mm). Please remember that, possibly with a different camera or different software will display the detail information of different as well (usually an older camera will contain less information), but basically all will display the basic information.

EXIF data will be very useful in a number of purposes, but the main thing is allows photographers to compare the images and figure out what is right and wrong in the outcome of the photo. For example, when looking at the photo above again and think ‘Ohh, should I use a depth of field that is wider that faces evenly focused‘. Thought so then I can see the aperture is used when shooting f / 2, so next time if I want the depth of field that is wider, I at least use a smaller aperture (f/2.8 or f/3.5).

Using EXIF data may not something you would do on any the images of you, but this will be very useful if you are in a new position began to enter the world of digital photography and want to improve your photography techniques.

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